Election 2021 and the abortion conversation

16/08/2021 / blog posts 
After weeks of speculation Election 2021 is underway, and policies related to abortion are already being discussed. Prime Minister Trudeau brought the spotlight to the issue by visiting the activist-run private abortion Clinic 554 in Fredericton, N.B. followed by an announcement that the government would be funding research into the availability of abortion in the province. Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole then commented in support of the government of New Brunswick’s ability to decide for themselves how to fund abortion.

Even though Parliament does not have jurisdiction over health care spending, it is noteworthy that the major party leaders are taking this time to comment on New Brunswick’s decision not to fund abortion in private clinics. Even before the election was called, party leaders were acknowledging the abortion conversation and trying to stake out positions.

As you likely recall, Parliament recently debated Bill C-233, the Sex Selective Abortion Act. Many Canadians engaged with their MPs on this bill, and thousands of pink envelopes were sent to Members of Parliament with messages in support of the Sex Selective Abortion Act. Despite all federal party leaders affirming their pro-abortion positions, 82 MPs voted in favor of this bill and the polls show that the majority of Canadians support a restriction on sex selection. While the bill was defeated, our leaders were undeniably reminded that abortion is an issue that matters deeply to many Canadians.

Together, let’s make sure that reminder stays front and center, and that the need to protect pre-born children is consistently repeated in this election campaign.

An election is an opportunity for us to remind our leaders that abortion is not fundamentally a political issue, but a life issue – that each abortion involves a pre-born child losing their life.

As they campaign, politicians should be confronted daily with the reality of the injustice of abortion. They should be asked repeatedly what action they will take to restrict abortion, and how they will represent pro-life Canadians. By asking specific questions and expecting specific answers, we can direct candidates to find common ground between all Canadians. Then we can reach a starting point for protecting pre-born children.

Many Canadians are pro-choice but also support a law against sex selective abortion. And not every pro-choice Canadian supports their taxes going to fund private abortion clinics. There is plenty of room for a nuanced conversation about the common ground Canadians share when it comes to abortion restrictions.

So get to know your local candidates. Read their material and visit their websites, attend a campaign event or all-candidates meeting in your area. If there is a pro-life candidate in your riding that you’d like to see succeed, consider donating to or volunteering for their campaign! You can get in touch with our friends at Right Now if you’d like to learn more about getting involved in a partisan way in your community.

And of course, when the time comes, vote! Vote for the local candidate you most want to represent you, and encourage your friends to get out and vote too. Let’s use the freedom we are blessed with here in Canada to speak up during this election campaign, to encourage others to be involved in the political process, and to add our vote to those who are counted.

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